Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 5.543 IF 5-year
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  • h5-index value: 89 h5-index 89
ACP cover
Executive editors:
Ulrich
 
Pöschl
,
Ken Carslaw, Thomas Koop, Rolf Sander & William Thomas Sturges

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

News

ACP editor Ulrich Pöschl receives Copernicus Medal 2015

22 Apr 2015

The Copernicus Medal 2015 was awarded to Professor Ulrich Pöschl for his outstanding and pioneering work as well as his contributions to open science.

Website relaunch

05 Mar 2015

The ACP website has been given a new look, and the navigation has been adjusted.
Further details:

TU Delft and Copernicus Publications cooperate in supporting open access

22 Jan 2015

In order to further promote open access, the TU Delft Library has transferred a budget to Copernicus to be used by its scientists in 2015.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

Understanding ozone trends in the vertical is vital in terms of assessing the success of the Montreal Protocol. This paper compares and analyses the long-term trends in stratospheric ozone from seven new merged satellite data sets. The data sets largely agree well with each other, particularly for the negative trends seen in the early period 1984-1997. For the 1998-2011 period there is less agreement, but a clear shift from negative to mostly positive trends.

F. Tummon, B. Hassler, N. R. P. Harris, J. Staehelin, W. Steinbrecht, J. Anderson, G. E. Bodeker, A. Bourassa, S. M. Davis, D. Degenstein, S. M. Frith, L. Froidevaux, E. Kyrölä, M. Laine, C. Long, A. A. Penckwitt, C. E. Sioris, K. H. Rosenlof, C. Roth, H.-J. Wang, and J. Wild

We show that atmospheric load of ice nuclei is enhanced for up to 20 days after key rainfall events. The rate of enhancement decreases exponentially with time. Rainfall quantity and frequency are increased for a similar duration and with similar exponential decreases thereby supporting the notion of rainfall feedback. We reveal series of significant feedback in rainfall patterns across Australia over the past century and marked changes in feedback patterns, and we indicate their locations.

E. K. Bigg, S. Soubeyrand, and C. E. Morris

This work represents the first application of two-dimensional gas chromatography to broadly characterize the gas-phase emissions of biomass burning, including comparisons among the emissions from burns of selected conifer, grass, crop residue, and peat fuel types. In these smoke samples, over 700 compounds were detected, which are discussed in the context of potential secondary organic aerosol formation.

L. E. Hatch, W. Luo, J. F. Pankow, R. J. Yokelson, C. E. Stockwell, and K. C. Barsanti

This paper describes a new ensemble methodology for the statistical analysis of atmospheric gas- & particle-phase composition data sets. The methodology reduces the huge amount of data derived from many chamber experiments to show that organic reactivity & resultant particle formation can be mapped into unique clusters in statistical space. The model generated is used to map more realistic plant mesocosm oxidation data, the projection of which gives insight into reactive pathways & precursors.

K. P. Wyche, P. S. Monks, K. L. Smallbone, J. F. Hamilton, M. R. Alfarra, A. R. Rickard, G. B. McFiggans, M. E. Jenkin, W. J. Bloss, A. C. Ryan, C. N Hewitt, and A. R MacKenzie

Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are short-lived organic trace gases and important precursors of secondary organic aerosol. Measurements over oceans are sparse. We present the first in situ glyoxal and methylglyoxal observations over remote temperate oceans, alongside observations of precursor gases. Precursor gases cannot explain observed mixing ratios, highlighting an unknown source. We show a large discrepancy between calculated vertical column densities of glyoxal and those retrieved by satellite.

S. J. Lawson, P. W. Selleck, I. E. Galbally, M. D. Keywood, M. J. Harvey, C. Lerot, D. Helmig, and Z. Ristovski

Publications Copernicus