ACP cover
Executive editors: Ulrich Pöschl, Ken Carslaw, Barbara Ervens & Thomas Koop

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is a not-for-profit international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

Dear colleagues, due to the current coronavirus situation, we are experiencing unusual challenges and delays in manuscript handling and reviewing, for which we would like to ask for your understanding.

Many thanks and best wishes, the ACP executive editors on behalf of the editorial board

IF value: 6.133
IF6.133
IF 5-year value: 6.546
IF 5-year6.546
CiteScore value: 10.1
CiteScore10.1
h5-index value: 93
h5-index93
Highlight articles
22 Oct 2021
An Arctic ozone hole in 2020 if not for the Montreal Protocol
Catherine Wilka, Susan Solomon, Doug Kinnison, and David Tarasick
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15771–15781, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15771-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15771-2021, 2021
Short summary
19 Oct 2021
Self-consistent global transport of metallic ions with WACCM-X
Jianfei Wu, Wuhu Feng, Han-Li Liu, Xianghui Xue, Daniel Robert Marsh, and John Maurice Campbell Plane
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15619–15630, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15619-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15619-2021, 2021
Short summary
18 Oct 2021
Direct estimates of biomass burning NOx emissions and lifetimes using daily observations from TROPOMI
Xiaomeng Jin, Qindan Zhu, and Ronald C. Cohen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15569–15587, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15569-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15569-2021, 2021
Short summary
15 Oct 2021
How alkaline compounds control atmospheric aerosol particle acidity
Vlassis A. Karydis, Alexandra P. Tsimpidi, Andrea Pozzer, and Jos Lelieveld
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14983–15001, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14983-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14983-2021, 2021
Short summary
13 Oct 2021
Aerosol–cloud interactions: the representation of heterogeneous ice activation in cloud models
Bernd Kärcher and Claudia Marcolli
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15213–15220, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15213-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15213-2021, 2021
Short summary
Recent papers
22 Oct 2021
An Arctic ozone hole in 2020 if not for the Montreal Protocol
Catherine Wilka, Susan Solomon, Doug Kinnison, and David Tarasick
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15771–15781, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15771-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15771-2021, 2021
Short summary
22 Oct 2021
The unexpected smoke layer in the High Arctic winter stratosphere during MOSAiC 2019–2020
Kevin Ohneiser, Albert Ansmann, Alexandra Chudnovsky, Ronny Engelmann, Christoph Ritter, Igor Veselovskii, Holger Baars, Henriette Gebauer, Hannes Griesche, Martin Radenz, Julian Hofer, Dietrich Althausen, Sandro Dahlke, and Marion Maturilli
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15783–15808, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15783-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15783-2021, 2021
Short summary
22 Oct 2021
Improving the representation of HONO chemistry in CMAQ and examining its impact on haze over China
Shuping Zhang, Golam Sarwar, Jia Xing, Biwu Chu, Chaoyang Xue, Arunachalam Sarav, Dian Ding, Haotian Zheng, Yujing Mu, Fengkui Duan, Tao Ma, and Hong He
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15809–15826, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15809-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15809-2021, 2021
Short summary
22 Oct 2021
Measurement report: Variability in the composition of biogenic volatile organic compounds in a Southeastern US forest and their role in atmospheric reactivity
Deborah F. McGlynn, Laura E. R. Barry, Manuel T. Lerdau, Sally E. Pusede, and Gabriel Isaacman-VanWertz
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15755–15770, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15755-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15755-2021, 2021
Short summary
22 Oct 2021
The impact of nitrogen and sulfur emissions from shipping on the exceedance of critical loads in the Baltic Sea region
Sara Jutterström, Filip Moldan, Jana Moldanová, Matthias Karl, Volker Matthias, and Maximilian Posch
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15827–15845, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15827-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15827-2021, 2021
Short summary
Scheduled special issues
Sea2Cloud (ACP/OS inter-journal SI)
01 Oct 2021–31 Oct 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Susannah Burrows and Maria Kanakidou | Karine Sellegri, Cliff Law, and Mike Harvey | Information
07 Jul 2021–31 Dec 2024 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Astrid Kiendler-Scharr and Stefania Gilardoni | Co-organizers: Paolo Laj and Giulia Saponaro | Information
20 May 2021–19 May 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Jianzhong Ma and Neil Harris | Co-organizers: Jos Lelieveld and Christiane Voigt | Information
31 Mar 2021–31 Dec 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Graham Feingold and Gordon McFiggans | Co-organizers: Simon Unterstrasser and Sylwester Arabas | Information
22 Feb 2021–31 Jan 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Franziska Glassmeier and Timothy Garrett | Co-organizers: Silke Trömel and Johannes Quaas | Information
News
15 Oct 2021 New ACP Letter: How alkaline compounds control atmospheric aerosol particle acidity

Aerosol particle pH is well-buffered by alkaline compounds, notably NH3 and crustal elements. NH3 is found to supply remarkable buffering capacity on a global scale, from the polluted continents to the remote oceans.

15 Oct 2021 New ACP Letter: How alkaline compounds control atmospheric aerosol particle acidity

Aerosol particle pH is well-buffered by alkaline compounds, notably NH3 and crustal elements. NH3 is found to supply remarkable buffering capacity on a global scale, from the polluted continents to the remote oceans.

01 Oct 2021 First insights from new EGU author survey

In April 2021 the EGU Publications Committee launched the first author survey to routinely ask authors about their publishing experience in EGU journals, in order to learn more about how EGU and Copernicus can serve the scientific community with their publications. Over the last 6 months, 160 contact authors answered the survey representing about 10% of the papers published during this time. We are delighted about the positive feedback and thank all authors. Please read the full report.

01 Oct 2021 First insights from new EGU author survey

In April 2021 the EGU Publications Committee launched the first author survey to routinely ask authors about their publishing experience in EGU journals, in order to learn more about how EGU and Copernicus can serve the scientific community with their publications. Over the last 6 months, 160 contact authors answered the survey representing about 10% of the papers published during this time. We are delighted about the positive feedback and thank all authors. Please read the full report.

27 Sep 2021 New ACP Letter: The driving factors of new particle formation and growth in the polluted boundary layer

Experiments at CLOUD show that in polluted environments new particle formation (NPF) is largely driven by the formation of sulfuric acid-base clusters, stabilized by amines, high ammonia concentrations or lower temperatures.

27 Sep 2021 New ACP Letter: The driving factors of new particle formation and growth in the polluted boundary layer

Experiments at CLOUD show that in polluted environments new particle formation (NPF) is largely driven by the formation of sulfuric acid-base clusters, stabilized by amines, high ammonia concentrations or lower temperatures.