ACP cover
Executive editors:
Ulrich
 
Pöschl
,
Ken Carslaw, Barbara Ervens & Thomas Koop

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is a not-for-profit international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

Dear colleagues, due to the current coronavirus situation, we are experiencing unusual challenges and delays in manuscript handling and reviewing, for which we would like to ask for your understanding.

Many thanks and best wishes, the ACP executive editors on behalf of the editorial board

IF value: 5.414
IF5.414
IF 5-year value: 5.958
IF 5-year5.958
CiteScore value: 9.7
CiteScore9.7
h5-index value: 89
h5-index89
Recent papers
24 Feb 2021
Recommendations on benchmarks for numerical air quality model applications in China – Part 1: PM2.5 and chemical species
Ling Huang, Yonghui Zhu, Hehe Zhai, Shuhui Xue, Tianyi Zhu, Yun Shao, Ziyi Liu, Chris Emery, Greg Yarwood, Yangjun Wang, Joshua Fu, Kun Zhang, and Li Li
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2725–2743, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2725-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2725-2021, 2021
Short summary
24 Feb 2021
Global modeling studies of composition and decadal trends of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer
Adriana Bossolasco, Fabrice Jegou, Pasquale Sellitto, Gwenaël Berthet, Corinna Kloss, and Bernard Legras
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2745–2764, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2745-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2745-2021, 2021
Short summary
24 Feb 2021
A-Train estimates of the sensitivity of the cloud-to-rainwater ratio to cloud size, relative humidity, and aerosols
Kevin M. Smalley and Anita D. Rapp
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2765–2779, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2765-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2765-2021, 2021
Short summary
24 Feb 2021
The spring transition of the North Pacific jet and its relation to deep stratosphere-to-troposphere mass transport over western North America
Melissa L. Breeden, Amy H. Butler, John R. Albers, Michael Sprenger, and Andrew O'Neil Langford
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2781–2794, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2781-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2781-2021, 2021
Short summary
24 Feb 2021
Technical note: Emission mapping of key sectors in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, using satellite-derived urban land use data
Trang Thi Quynh Nguyen, Wataru Takeuchi, Prakhar Misra, and Hayashida Sachiko
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2795–2818, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2795-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2795-2021, 2021
Short summary
Highlight articles
24 Feb 2021
A-Train estimates of the sensitivity of the cloud-to-rainwater ratio to cloud size, relative humidity, and aerosols
Kevin M. Smalley and Anita D. Rapp
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2765–2779, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2765-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2765-2021, 2021
Short summary
08 Feb 2021
Low-NO atmospheric oxidation pathways in a polluted megacity
Mike J. Newland, Daniel J. Bryant, Rachel E. Dunmore, Thomas J. Bannan, W. Joe F. Acton, Ben Langford, James R. Hopkins, Freya A. Squires, William Dixon, William S. Drysdale, Peter D. Ivatt, Mathew J. Evans, Peter M. Edwards, Lisa K. Whalley, Dwayne E. Heard, Eloise J. Slater, Robert Woodward-Massey, Chunxiang Ye, Archit Mehra, Stephen D. Worrall, Asan Bacak, Hugh Coe, Carl J. Percival, C. Nicholas Hewitt, James D. Lee, Tianqu Cui, Jason D. Surratt, Xinming Wang, Alastair C. Lewis, Andrew R. Rickard, and Jacqueline F. Hamilton
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 1613–1625, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1613-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1613-2021, 2021
Short summary
04 Feb 2021
An overview of the ORACLES (ObseRvations of Aerosols above CLouds and their intEractionS) project: aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions in the southeast Atlantic basin
Jens Redemann, Robert Wood, Paquita Zuidema, Sarah J. Doherty, Bernadette Luna, Samuel E. LeBlanc, Michael S. Diamond, Yohei Shinozuka, Ian Y. Chang, Rei Ueyama, Leonhard Pfister, Ju-Mee Ryoo, Amie N. Dobracki, Arlindo M. da Silva, Karla M. Longo, Meloë S. Kacenelenbogen, Connor J. Flynn, Kristina Pistone, Nichola M. Knox, Stuart J. Piketh, James M. Haywood, Paola Formenti, Marc Mallet, Philip Stier, Andrew S. Ackerman, Susanne E. Bauer, Ann M. Fridlind, Gregory R. Carmichael, Pablo E. Saide, Gonzalo A. Ferrada, Steven G. Howell, Steffen Freitag, Brian Cairns, Brent N. Holben, Kirk D. Knobelspiesse, Simone Tanelli, Tristan S. L'Ecuyer, Andrew M. Dzambo, Ousmane O. Sy, Greg M. McFarquhar, Michael R. Poellot, Siddhant Gupta, Joseph R. O'Brien, Athanasios Nenes, Mary Kacarab, Jenny P. S. Wong, Jennifer D. Small-Griswold, Kenneth L. Thornhill, David Noone, James R. Podolske, K. Sebastian Schmidt, Peter Pilewskie, Hong Chen, Sabrina P. Cochrane, Arthur J. Sedlacek, Timothy J. Lang, Eric Stith, Michal Segal-Rozenhaimer, Richard A. Ferrare, Sharon P. Burton, Chris A. Hostetler, David J. Diner, Felix C. Seidel, Steven E. Platnick, Jeffrey S. Myers, Kerry G. Meyer, Douglas A. Spangenberg, Hal Maring, and Lan Gao
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 1507–1563, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1507-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1507-2021, 2021
Short summary
04 Feb 2021
Mass accommodation and gas–particle partitioning in secondary organic aerosols: dependence on diffusivity, volatility, particle-phase reactions, and penetration depth
Manabu Shiraiwa and Ulrich Pöschl
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 1565–1580, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1565-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1565-2021, 2021
Short summary
18 Jan 2021
Opinion: Cloud-phase climate feedback and the importance of ice-nucleating particles
Benjamin J. Murray, Kenneth S. Carslaw, and Paul R. Field
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 665–679, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-665-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-665-2021, 2021
Short summary
Scheduled special issues
Fusion of radar polarimetry and numerical atmospheric modelling towards an improved understanding of cloud and precipitation processes (ACP/AMT/GMD inter-journal SI)
22 Feb 2021–31 Jan 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Franziska Glassmeier and Timothy Garrett | Co-organizers: Silke Trömel and Johannes Quaas | Information
01 Feb 2021–31 Dec 2022 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Corinna Hoose and Steven Brown | Co-organizers: Jeffrey S. Reid, Susan van den Heever, Luke Ziemba, and Larry Di Girolamo | Information
01 Nov 2020–31 Oct 2021 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Maria Kanakidou and Paul Zieger | Co-organizers: Mark Flanner, Hans-Christen Hansson, and Sabine Eckhardt | Information
AQMEII4: a detailed assessment of atmospheric deposition processes from point models to regional-scale models
01 Sep 2020–31 Aug 2022 | ACP co-editors: Alex B. Guenther and Joshua Fu | Co-organizers: Stefano Galmarini, Paul Makar, Olivia Clifton, and Christian Hogrefe | Information
01 Aug 2020–31 Jul 2022 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Hailong Wang and Anja Schmidt | Co-organizer: Ben Kravitz | Information
News
01 Feb 2021 Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021

With great sadness, we have to announce that Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021. Paul was not only an outstanding scientist and scholar, but a friend, colleague, and mentor for generations of atmospheric scientists. He had also been a long-time supporter of open-access publishing within EGU, where he played a key role in the foundation and establishment of its first OA journal, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, and served on its advisory board for many years. He will be sorely missed. Our thoughts are with his family. (Image credit: MPI for Chemistry)

01 Feb 2021 Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021

With great sadness, we have to announce that Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021. Paul was not only an outstanding scientist and scholar, but a friend, colleague, and mentor for generations of atmospheric scientists. He had also been a long-time supporter of open-access publishing within EGU, where he played a key role in the foundation and establishment of its first OA journal, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, and served on its advisory board for many years. He will be sorely missed. Our thoughts are with his family. (Image credit: MPI for Chemistry)

14 Jan 2021 Atmospheric evolution of emissions from a boreal forest fire: the formation of highly functionalized oxygen-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing organic compounds

Forest fires are an important source of reactive organic gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. The authors analyzed organic aerosols collected from an aircraft above a boreal forest fire and reported an increasing contribution from compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur as the plume aged, with sulfide and ring-bound nitrogen functionality.

14 Jan 2021 Atmospheric evolution of emissions from a boreal forest fire: the formation of highly functionalized oxygen-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing organic compounds

Forest fires are an important source of reactive organic gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. The authors analyzed organic aerosols collected from an aircraft above a boreal forest fire and reported an increasing contribution from compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur as the plume aged, with sulfide and ring-bound nitrogen functionality.

07 Dec 2020 Mobile measurements help quantify and attribute methane emission sources in urban areas

Methane is an important energy source in Europe, but also a strong greenhouse gas. Previous research in the United States has shown that new equipment detects considerably more gas leaks than equipment currently used by local gas utilities. This also appears to be the case in two European cities, Hamburg in Germany and Utrecht in the Netherlands, researchers write today in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

07 Dec 2020 Mobile measurements help quantify and attribute methane emission sources in urban areas

Methane is an important energy source in Europe, but also a strong greenhouse gas. Previous research in the United States has shown that new equipment detects considerably more gas leaks than equipment currently used by local gas utilities. This also appears to be the case in two European cities, Hamburg in Germany and Utrecht in the Netherlands, researchers write today in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.