ACP cover
Executive editors:
Ulrich
 
Pöschl
,
Ken Carslaw, Barbara Ervens & Thomas Koop

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is a not-for-profit international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

Dear colleagues, due to the current coronavirus situation, we are experiencing unusual challenges and delays in manuscript handling and reviewing, for which we would like to ask for your understanding.

Many thanks and best wishes, the ACP executive editors on behalf of the editorial board

IF value: 5.414
IF5.414
IF 5-year value: 5.958
IF 5-year5.958
CiteScore value: 9.7
CiteScore9.7
h5-index value: 89
h5-index89
Recent papers
16 Apr 2021
The impact threshold of the aerosol radiative forcing on the boundary layer structure in the pollution region
Dandan Zhao, Jinyuan Xin, Chongshui Gong, Jiannong Quan, Yuesi Wang, Guiqian Tang, Yongxiang Ma, Lindong Dai, Xiaoyan Wu, Guangjing Liu, and Yongjing Ma
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5739–5753, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5739-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5739-2021, 2021
Short summary
16 Apr 2021
Production of HONO from NO2 uptake on illuminated TiO2 aerosol particles and following the illumination of mixed TiO2∕ammonium nitrate particles
Joanna E. Dyson, Graham A. Boustead, Lauren T. Fleming, Mark Blitz, Daniel Stone, Stephen R. Arnold, Lisa K. Whalley, and Dwayne E. Heard
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5755–5775, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5755-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5755-2021, 2021
Short summary
16 Apr 2021
Zeppelin-led study on the onset of new particle formation in the planetary boundary layer
Janne Lampilahti, Hanna E. Manninen, Tuomo Nieminen, Sander Mirme, Mikael Ehn, Iida Pullinen, Katri Leino, Siegfried Schobesberger, Juha Kangasluoma, Jenni Kontkanen, Emma Järvinen, Riikka Väänänen, Taina Yli-Juuti, Radovan Krejci, Katrianne Lehtipalo, Janne Levula, Aadu Mirme, Stefano Decesari, Ralf Tillmann, Douglas R. Worsnop, Franz Rohrer, Astrid Kiendler-Scharr, Tuukka Petäjä, Veli-Matti Kerminen, Thomas F. Mentel, and Markku Kulmala
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-282,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-282, 2021
Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
Short summary
15 Apr 2021
Chemical composition of PM2.5 in October 2017 Northern California wildfire plumes
Yutong Liang, Coty N. Jen, Robert J. Weber, Pawel K. Misztal, and Allen H. Goldstein
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5719–5737, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5719-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5719-2021, 2021
Short summary
15 Apr 2021
A study of the effect of aerosols on surface ozone through meteorology feedbacks over China
Yawei Qu, Apostolos Voulgarakis, Tijian Wang, Matthew Kasoar, Chris Wells, Cheng Yuan, Sunil Varma, and Laura Mansfield
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5705–5718, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5705-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5705-2021, 2021
Short summary
Highlight articles
14 Apr 2021
Uncertainties in the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) emission inventory of greenhouse gases
Efisio Solazzo, Monica Crippa, Diego Guizzardi, Marilena Muntean, Margarita Choulga, and Greet Janssens-Maenhout
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5655–5683, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5655-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5655-2021, 2021
Short summary
31 Mar 2021
Evaluating stratospheric ozone and water vapour changes in CMIP6 models from 1850 to 2100
James Keeble, Birgit Hassler, Antara Banerjee, Ramiro Checa-Garcia, Gabriel Chiodo, Sean Davis, Veronika Eyring, Paul T. Griffiths, Olaf Morgenstern, Peer Nowack, Guang Zeng, Jiankai Zhang, Greg Bodeker, Susannah Burrows, Philip Cameron-Smith, David Cugnet, Christopher Danek, Makoto Deushi, Larry W. Horowitz, Anne Kubin, Lijuan Li, Gerrit Lohmann, Martine Michou, Michael J. Mills, Pierre Nabat, Dirk Olivié, Sungsu Park, Øyvind Seland, Jens Stoll, Karl-Hermann Wieners, and Tongwen Wu
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5015–5061, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5015-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5015-2021, 2021
Short summary
22 Mar 2021
The behavior of high-CAPE (convective available potential energy) summer convection in large-domain large-eddy simulations with ICON
Harald Rybka, Ulrike Burkhardt, Martin Köhler, Ioanna Arka, Luca Bugliaro, Ulrich Görsdorf, Ákos Horváth, Catrin I. Meyer, Jens Reichardt, Axel Seifert, and Johan Strandgren
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4285–4318, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4285-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4285-2021, 2021
Short summary
18 Mar 2021
Interhemispheric transport of metallic ions within ionospheric sporadic E layers by the lower thermospheric meridional circulation
Bingkun Yu, Xianghui Xue, Christopher J. Scott, Jianfei Wu, Xinan Yue, Wuhu Feng, Yutian Chi, Daniel R. Marsh, Hanli Liu, Xiankang Dou, and John M. C. Plane
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4219–4230, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4219-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4219-2021, 2021
Short summary
11 Mar 2021
Sensitivities to biological aerosol particle properties and ageing processes: potential implications for aerosol–cloud interactions and optical properties
Minghui Zhang, Amina Khaled, Pierre Amato, Anne-Marie Delort, and Barbara Ervens
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 3699–3724, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-3699-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-3699-2021, 2021
Short summary
Scheduled special issues
31 Mar 2021–31 Dec 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Graham Feingold and Gordon McFiggans | Co-organizers: Simon Unterstrasser and Sylwester Arabas | Information
22 Feb 2021–31 Jan 2023 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Franziska Glassmeier and Timothy Garrett | Co-organizers: Silke Trömel and Johannes Quaas | Information
01 Feb 2021–31 Dec 2022 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Corinna Hoose and Steven Brown | Co-organizers: Jeffrey S. Reid, Susan van den Heever, Luke Ziemba, and Larry Di Girolamo | Information
01 Nov 2020–31 Oct 2021 | ACP co-editors | Coordinators: Maria Kanakidou and Paul Zieger | Co-organizers: Mark Flanner, Hans-Christen Hansson, and Sabine Eckhardt | Information
AQMEII4: a detailed assessment of atmospheric deposition processes from point models to regional-scale models
01 Sep 2020–31 Aug 2022 | ACP co-editors: Alex B. Guenther and Joshua Fu | Co-organizers: Stefano Galmarini, Paul Makar, Olivia Clifton, and Christian Hogrefe | Information
News
18 Mar 2021 New ACP Letter: Interhemispheric transport of metallic ions within ionospheric sporadic E layers by the lower thermospheric meridional circulation

A long-standing mystery of metal ions within Es layers in the Earth's upper atmosphere is the marked seasonal dependence, with a summer maximum and a winter minimum. We report a large-scale winter-to-summer transport of metal ions from 6-year multi-satellite observations and worldwide ground-based stations. A global atmospheric circulation is responsible for the phenomenon. Our results emphasise the effect of this atmospheric circulation on the transport of composition in the upper atmosphere.

18 Mar 2021 New ACP Letter: Interhemispheric transport of metallic ions within ionospheric sporadic E layers by the lower thermospheric meridional circulation

A long-standing mystery of metal ions within Es layers in the Earth's upper atmosphere is the marked seasonal dependence, with a summer maximum and a winter minimum. We report a large-scale winter-to-summer transport of metal ions from 6-year multi-satellite observations and worldwide ground-based stations. A global atmospheric circulation is responsible for the phenomenon. Our results emphasise the effect of this atmospheric circulation on the transport of composition in the upper atmosphere.

01 Feb 2021 Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021

With great sadness, we have to announce that Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021. Paul was not only an outstanding scientist and scholar, but a friend, colleague, and mentor for generations of atmospheric scientists. He had also been a long-time supporter of open-access publishing within EGU, where he played a key role in the foundation and establishment of its first OA journal, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, and served on its advisory board for many years. He will be sorely missed. Our thoughts are with his family. (Image credit: MPI for Chemistry)

01 Feb 2021 Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021

With great sadness, we have to announce that Paul J. Crutzen has passed away on 28 January 2021. Paul was not only an outstanding scientist and scholar, but a friend, colleague, and mentor for generations of atmospheric scientists. He had also been a long-time supporter of open-access publishing within EGU, where he played a key role in the foundation and establishment of its first OA journal, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, and served on its advisory board for many years. He will be sorely missed. Our thoughts are with his family. (Image credit: MPI for Chemistry)

14 Jan 2021 Atmospheric evolution of emissions from a boreal forest fire: the formation of highly functionalized oxygen-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing organic compounds

Forest fires are an important source of reactive organic gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. The authors analyzed organic aerosols collected from an aircraft above a boreal forest fire and reported an increasing contribution from compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur as the plume aged, with sulfide and ring-bound nitrogen functionality.

14 Jan 2021 Atmospheric evolution of emissions from a boreal forest fire: the formation of highly functionalized oxygen-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing organic compounds

Forest fires are an important source of reactive organic gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. The authors analyzed organic aerosols collected from an aircraft above a boreal forest fire and reported an increasing contribution from compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur as the plume aged, with sulfide and ring-bound nitrogen functionality.