Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
ACP cover
Executive editors:
Ulrich
 
Pöschl
,
Ken Carslaw, Maria Cristina Facchini, Thomas Koop & Rolf Sander

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

Recent papers
20 Jul 2018
The Δ17O and δ18O values of atmospheric nitrates simultaneously collected downwind of anthropogenic sources – implications for polluted air masses
Martine M. Savard, Amanda S. Cole, Robert Vet, and Anna Smirnoff
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10373-10389, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10373-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10373-2018, 2018
20 Jul 2018
A new Description of Probability Density Distributions of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC)
Uwe Berger, Gerd Baumgarten, Jens Fiedler, and Franz-Josef Lübken
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-642,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-642, 2018
Manuscript under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
20 Jul 2018
Tropospheric CO vertical profiles measured by IAGOS aircraft in 2002–2017 and the role of biomass burning
Hervé Petetin, Bastien Sauvage, Mark Parrington, Hannah Clark, Alain Fontaine, Gilles Athier, Romain Blot, Damien Boulanger, Jean-Marc Cousin, Philippe Nédélec, and Valérie Thouret
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-665,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-665, 2018
Manuscript under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
19 Jul 2018
Long-term observations of cloud condensation nuclei over the Amazon rain forest – Part 2: Variability and characteristics of biomass burning, long-range transport, and pristine rain forest aerosols
Mira L. Pöhlker, Florian Ditas, Jorge Saturno, Thomas Klimach, Isabella Hrabě de Angelis, Alessandro C. Araùjo, Joel Brito, Samara Carbone, Yafang Cheng, Xuguang Chi, Reiner Ditz, Sachin S. Gunthe, Bruna A. Holanda, Konrad Kandler, Jürgen Kesselmeier, Tobias Könemann, Ovid O. Krüger, Jošt V. Lavrič, Scot T. Martin, Eugene Mikhailov, Daniel Moran-Zuloaga, Luciana V. Rizzo, Diana Rose, Hang Su, Ryan Thalman, David Walter, Jian Wang, Stefan Wolff, Henrique M. J. Barbosa, Paulo Artaxo, Meinrat O. Andreae, Ulrich Pöschl, and Christopher Pöhlker
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10289-10331, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10289-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10289-2018, 2018
19 Jul 2018
Online gas- and particle-phase measurements of organosulfates, organosulfonates and nitrooxy organosulfates in Beijing utilizing a FIGAERO ToF-CIMS
Michael Le Breton, Yujue Wang, Åsa M. Hallquist, Ravi Kant Pathak, Jing Zheng, Yudong Yang, Dongjie Shang, Marianne Glasius, Thomas J. Bannan, Qianyun Liu, Chak K. Chan, Carl J. Percival, Wenfei Zhu, Shengrong Lou, David Topping, Yuchen Wang, Jianzhen Yu, Keding Lu, Song Guo, Min Hu, and Mattias Hallquist
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10355-10371, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10355-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10355-2018, 2018
Highlight articles
16 Jul 2018
Mineralogy and physicochemical features of Saharan dust wet deposited in the Iberian Peninsula during an extreme red rain event
Carlos Rodriguez-Navarro, Fulvio di Lorenzo, and Kerstin Elert
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10089-10122, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10089-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10089-2018, 2018
12 Jul 2018
Statistical analysis of contrail to cirrus evolution during the Contrail and Cirrus Experiment (CONCERT)
Aurélien Chauvigné, Olivier Jourdan, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, Christophe Gourbeyre, Jean François Gayet, Christiane Voigt, Hans Schlager, Stefan Kaufmann, Stephan Borrmann, Sergej Molleker, Andreas Minikin, Tina Jurkat, and Ulrich Schumann
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9803-9822, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9803-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9803-2018, 2018
06 Jul 2018
Transboundary ozone pollution across East Asia: daily evolution and photochemical production analysed by IASI + GOME2 multispectral satellite observations and models
Juan Cuesta, Yugo Kanaya, Masayuki Takigawa, Gaëlle Dufour, Maxim Eremenko, Gilles Foret, Kazuyuki Miyazaki, and Matthias Beekmann
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9499-9525, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9499-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9499-2018, 2018
06 Jul 2018
The diurnal cycle of cloud profiles over land and ocean between 51° S and 51° N, seen by the CATS spaceborne lidar from the International Space Station
Vincent Noel, Hélène Chepfer, Marjolaine Chiriaco, and John Yorks
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9457-9473, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9457-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9457-2018, 2018
03 Jul 2018
High- and low-temperature pyrolysis profiles describe volatile organic compound emissions from western US wildfire fuels
Kanako Sekimoto, Abigail R. Koss, Jessica B. Gilman, Vanessa Selimovic, Matthew M. Coggon, Kyle J. Zarzana, Bin Yuan, Brian M. Lerner, Steven S. Brown, Carsten Warneke, Robert J. Yokelson, James M. Roberts, and Joost de Gouw
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9263-9281, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9263-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9263-2018, 2018
Scheduled special issues
Regional assessment of air pollution and climate change over East and Southeast Asia: results from MICS-Asia Phase III
01 Aug 2018–31 Dec 2019 | J. S. Fu, G. R. Carmichael, Z. Wang, Y. Cheng, and Q. Zhang | Information
01 Jul 2018–31 Dec 2020 | M. K. Dubey, D. Spracklen, A. Sorooshian, J. Srinivasan, and B. V. Krishna Murthy | Information
21 Jun 2018–31 May 2022 | J. M. Haywood, P. Zuidema, P. Formenti, J. Schwarz, J. Riedi, P. Knippertz, N. Mihalopoulos, and F. Eckardt | Information
13 Jun 2018–31 Aug 2019 | | Information
09 May 2018–31 Dec 2019 | R. Krejci, J. Kay, M. Shupe, J. Heintzenberg, A. Solomon, T. Vihma, V. Walden, and K. Law | Information
News
27 Jun 2018 New Journal Impact Factors released

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

27 Jun 2018 New Journal Impact Factors released

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

03 May 2018 Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

03 May 2018 Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

06 Feb 2018 Press Release: Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing

The ozone layer – which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation – is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes, new research has found. The new result, published today in ACP, finds that the bottom part of the ozone layer at more populated latitudes is not recovering.

06 Feb 2018 Press Release: Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing

The ozone layer – which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation – is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes, new research has found. The new result, published today in ACP, finds that the bottom part of the ozone layer at more populated latitudes is not recovering.

Publications Copernicus