Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
ACP cover
Executive editors:
Ulrich
 
Pöschl
,
Ken Carslaw, Maria Cristina Facchini, Thomas Koop & Rolf Sander

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

A numerical model also used for operational weather forecast was applied to investigate the impact of contrails and contrail cirrus on the radiative fluxes at the earth's surface. Accounting for contrails produced by aircraft enables the model to simulate high clouds that are otherwise missing. In a case study, we find that the effect of these extra clouds is to reduce the incoming shortwave radiation at the surface as well as the production of photovoltaic power by up to 10 %.

Simon Gruber, Simon Unterstrasser, Jan Bechtold, Heike Vogel, Martin Jung, Henry Pak, and Bernhard Vogel

A new passive air sampler for gaseous mercury was tested at 20 sites on four continents. These sites have in common that they use the state-of-the-art active air sampling technique for gaseous mercury on a continuous basis and therefore allow for an evaluation and calibration of the passive sampler. The sampler proved to work exceptionally well, with a precision and accuracy on par with the active instrument and better than what has previously been achieved with passive samplers.

David S. McLagan, Carl P. J. Mitchell, Alexandra Steffen, Hayley Hung, Cecilia Shin, Geoff W. Stupple, Mark L. Olson, Winston T. Luke, Paul Kelley, Dean Howard, Grant C. Edwards, Peter F. Nelson, Hang Xiao, Guey-Rong Sheu, Annekatrin Dreyer, Haiyong Huang, Batual Abdul Hussain, Ying D. Lei, Ilana Tavshunsky, and Frank Wania

Detecting trends in short data sets of stratospheric molecules is difficult because of variability due to dynamical fluctuations. We suggest that one way around this difficulty is using the measurements of one molecule to remove dynamical variability from the measurements of another molecule. We illustrate this using Aura MLS measurements of N2O to help us sort out issues in the determination of trends in HCl. This shows that HCl is decreasing throughout the middle stratosphere as expected.

Richard S. Stolarski, Anne R. Douglass, and Susan E. Strahan

Synergistic effects between SOA formation and SO2 oxidation through Criegee chemistry and reactive uptake by organic peroxides were observed. The relative importance of these two pathways (Criegee vs. peroxide) varies with relative humidity. The latter SO2 loss mechanism to organic peroxides in SOA has not previously been identified. Our results suggest a new pathway of atmospheric SO2 oxidation, which may contribute to the missing mechanisms of high-sulfate production in the polluted areas.

Jianhuai Ye, Jonathan P. D. Abbatt, and Arthur W. H. Chan

Following decades of successful regulatory policies focused on combustion-related sources (e.g. motor vehicles), emissions from non-combustion sources have become increasingly important for urban air quality. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that emissions from consumer, commercial, and industrial products and materials have become prominent contributors to the formation of photochemical smog (i.e. secondary organic particulate matter and ozone) and its associated health effects.

Peeyush Khare and Drew R. Gentner

News
Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

Press Release: Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing 06 Feb 2018

The ozone layer – which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation – is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes, new research has found. The new result, published today in ACP, finds that the bottom part of the ozone layer at more populated latitudes is not recovering.

Thanks to Bill Sturges and welcome to Cristina Facchini as executive editors of ACP 17 Jan 2018

After more than 16 years of serving the scientific community of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) with great dedication and success, William T. (Bill) Sturges has resigned from the executive committee that coordinates the ACP editorial board.

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