Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
ACP cover
Executive editors:
Ulrich
 
Pöschl
,
Ken Carslaw, Maria Cristina Facchini, Thomas Koop & Rolf Sander

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of high-quality studies investigating the Earth's atmosphere and the underlying chemical and physical processes. It covers the altitude range from the land and ocean surface up to the turbopause, including the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere.

The main subject areas comprise atmospheric modelling, field measurements, remote sensing, and laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, clouds and precipitation, isotopes, radiation, dynamics, biosphere interactions, and hydrosphere interactions (for details see journal subject areas). The journal scope is focused on studies with general implications for atmospheric science rather than investigations that are primarily of local or technical interest.

Recent papers
16 Aug 2018
Seasonality of aerosol optical properties in the Arctic
Lauren Schmeisser, John Backman, John A. Ogren, Elisabeth Andrews, Eija Asmi, Sandra Starkweather, Taneil Uttal, Markus Fiebig, Sangeeta Sharma, Kostas Eleftheriadis, Stergios Vratolis, Michael Bergin, Peter Tunved, and Anne Jefferson
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11599-11622, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11599-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11599-2018, 2018
16 Aug 2018
Exploration of PM2.5 sources on the regional scale in the Pearl River Delta based on ME-2 modeling
Xiao-Feng Huang, Bei-Bing Zou, Ling-Yan He, Min Hu, André S. H. Prévôt, and Yuan-Hang Zhang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11563-11580, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11563-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11563-2018, 2018
16 Aug 2018
Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from NO3 radical + isoprene based on nighttime aircraft power plant plume transects
Juliane L. Fry, Steven S. Brown, Ann M. Middlebrook, Peter M. Edwards, Pedro Campuzano-Jost, Douglas A. Day, José L. Jimenez, Hannah M. Allen, Thomas B. Ryerson, Ilana Pollack, Martin Graus, Carsten Warneke, Joost A. de Gouw, Charles A. Brock, Jessica Gilman, Brian M. Lerner, William P. Dubé, Jin Liao, and André Welti
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11663-11682, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11663-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11663-2018, 2018
16 Aug 2018
Production of N2O5 and ClNO2 in summer in urban Beijing, China
Wei Zhou, Jian Zhao, Bin Ouyang, Archit Mehra, Weiqi Xu, Yuying Wang, Thomas J. Bannan, Stephen D. Worrall, Michael Priestley, Asan Bacak, Qi Chen, Conghui Xie, Qingqing Wang, Junfeng Wang, Wei Du, Yingjie Zhang, Xinlei Ge, Penglin Ye, James D. Lee, Pingqing Fu, Zifa Wang, Douglas Worsnop, Roderic Jones, Carl J. Percival, Hugh Coe, and Yele Sun
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11581-11597, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11581-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11581-2018, 2018
16 Aug 2018
Estimating the open biomass burning emissions in central and eastern China from 2003 to 2015 based on satellite observation
Jian Wu, Shaofei Kong, Fangqi Wu, Yi Cheng, Shurui Zheng, Qin Yan, Huang Zheng, Guowei Yang, Mingming Zheng, Dantong Liu, Delong Zhao, and Shihua Qi
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11623-11646, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11623-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11623-2018, 2018
Highlight articles
13 Aug 2018
Formation and evolution of tar balls from northwestern US wildfires
Arthur J. Sedlacek III, Peter R. Buseck, Kouji Adachi, Timothy B. Onasch, Stephen R. Springston, and Lawrence Kleinman
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11289-11301, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11289-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11289-2018, 2018
23 Jul 2018
HTAP2 multi-model estimates of premature human mortality due to intercontinental transport of air pollution and emission sectors
Ciao-Kai Liang, J. Jason West, Raquel A. Silva, Huisheng Bian, Mian Chin, Yanko Davila, Frank J. Dentener, Louisa Emmons, Johannes Flemming, Gerd Folberth, Daven Henze, Ulas Im, Jan Eiof Jonson, Terry J. Keating, Tom Kucsera, Allen Lenzen, Meiyun Lin, Marianne Tronstad Lund, Xiaohua Pan, Rokjin J. Park, R. Bradley Pierce, Takashi Sekiya, Kengo Sudo, and Toshihiko Takemura
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10497-10520, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10497-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10497-2018, 2018
16 Jul 2018
Mineralogy and physicochemical features of Saharan dust wet deposited in the Iberian Peninsula during an extreme red rain event
Carlos Rodriguez-Navarro, Fulvio di Lorenzo, and Kerstin Elert
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10089-10122, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10089-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10089-2018, 2018
12 Jul 2018
Statistical analysis of contrail to cirrus evolution during the Contrail and Cirrus Experiment (CONCERT)
Aurélien Chauvigné, Olivier Jourdan, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, Christophe Gourbeyre, Jean François Gayet, Christiane Voigt, Hans Schlager, Stefan Kaufmann, Stephan Borrmann, Sergej Molleker, Andreas Minikin, Tina Jurkat, and Ulrich Schumann
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9803-9822, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9803-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9803-2018, 2018
06 Jul 2018
Transboundary ozone pollution across East Asia: daily evolution and photochemical production analysed by IASI + GOME2 multispectral satellite observations and models
Juan Cuesta, Yugo Kanaya, Masayuki Takigawa, Gaëlle Dufour, Maxim Eremenko, Gilles Foret, Kazuyuki Miyazaki, and Matthias Beekmann
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9499-9525, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9499-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9499-2018, 2018
Scheduled special issues
Regional assessment of air pollution and climate change over East and Southeast Asia: results from MICS-Asia Phase III
01 Aug 2018–31 Dec 2019 | J. S. Fu, G. R. Carmichael, Z. Wang, Y. Cheng, and Q. Zhang | Information
01 Jul 2018–31 Dec 2020 | M. K. Dubey, D. Spracklen, A. Sorooshian, J. Srinivasan, and B. V. Krishna Murthy | Information
21 Jun 2018–31 May 2022 | J. M. Haywood, P. Zuidema, P. Formenti, J. Schwarz, J. Riedi, P. Knippertz, N. Mihalopoulos, and F. Eckardt | Information
13 Jun 2018–31 Aug 2019 | | Information
09 May 2018–31 Dec 2019 | R. Krejci, J. Kay, M. Shupe, J. Heintzenberg, A. Solomon, T. Vihma, V. Walden, and K. Law | Information
News
27 Jun 2018 New Journal Impact Factors released

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

27 Jun 2018 New Journal Impact Factors released

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

03 May 2018 Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

03 May 2018 Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

06 Feb 2018 Press Release: Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing

The ozone layer – which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation – is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes, new research has found. The new result, published today in ACP, finds that the bottom part of the ozone layer at more populated latitudes is not recovering.

06 Feb 2018 Press Release: Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing

The ozone layer – which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation – is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes, new research has found. The new result, published today in ACP, finds that the bottom part of the ozone layer at more populated latitudes is not recovering.

Publications Copernicus